NCOBPS, Inc. https://www.ncobps.org National Conference of Black Political Scientists Mon, 06 Jul 2020 20:04:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.4.2 https://www.ncobps.org/assets/uploads/2020/04/cropped-ncobps-favicon-32x32.png NCOBPS, Inc. https://www.ncobps.org 32 32 Dr. Lucius J. Barker, 1928-2020 https://www.ncobps.org/dr-lucius-j-barker Mon, 06 Jul 2020 20:04:02 +0000 https://www.ncobps.org/?p=4603 It is with deep sadness that we report the death of Dr. Lucius J.  Barker.  He died on  June 21st at the age of 92. He was preceded in death by his wife, Maude Barker, who passed away in May.  He had an illustrious career, spent mostly at Stanford University and Washington University in St. Louis, where he served as chairs of the political science departments.

Throughout his career he teamed with his brother, Twiley Barker, to author several studies on constitutional law and judicial decision-making.  The Barker brothers belonged to a Louisiana-based lineage of Black political scientists with strong ties to Southern University and A & M College.  Dr. Rodney Higgins, who mentored the brothers at Southern, introduced them to the field of constitutional law. They returned to teach at the university in the mid-1950s after receiving their doctorates. 

Dr. Barker had an extensive research catalogue.  His major works include African Americans and the American Political System (co-authored with Mack Jones and Katherine Tate), Civil Liberties and the Constitution: Cases and Commentaries (co-authored with Michael Combs, Kevin Lyles, H.W. Perry Jr., and Twiley Barker), and Freedom, Courts, Politics: Studies in Civil Liberties (co-authored with Twiley Barker). 

His leadership in the political science discipline was just as impressive as his scholarship.  He was elected President of the Midwest Political Science Association in the mid-1980s.  He was President of NCOBPS from 1983-1984.  He served from 1989-1993 as the inaugural editor of the organization’s long-lasting journal, the National Political Science Review (now the National Review of Black Politics)  He was the second African American to serve as President of the American Political Science Association (APSA) from 1992-1993.

During his tenure as NCOBPS president, the organization engaged in an energetic debate about the viability of Jesse Jackson’s presidential campaigns.  Emerging from these debates were numerous publications on Black presidential politics.  Barker was instrumental in this research trajectory.  He co-edited (with Ronald Walters) Jesse Jackson’s 1984 Presidential Campaign: Challenge and Change in America.  He wrote about his involvement in Jackson’s first presidential campaign in Our Time Has Come: A Delegate’s Diary of Jesse Jackson’s 1984 Presidential Campaign

Barker’s experiences growing up in the Jim Crow South shaped his broader perspectives about pluralism and political institutions.  His 1994 essay in the American Political Science Review titled, “Limits of Political Strategy: A Systemic View of the African American Experience,” examined the range of political strategies used by African Americans, e.g. litigation, electoral politics, interest group pressures, party politics, and direct action.  Each strategy, he argued, was limited in its ability to sustain racial justice.  This was of no fault of African Americans, but due to the failings of American democracy.  Still undeterred, he insisted that creating a fair and equitable society requires “extraordinary leadership” and persistent advocacy. 

Expanding the boundaries of the political science discipline was another theme of Barker’s research and advocacy.  In 2005, Perspectives of Politics assembled 12 APSA presidents to reflect on the state of the discipline.  In his commentary, Barker criticized the “gatekeepers” of the discipline for doing little to remedy the marginalization of African Americans, Latinos, and Native Americans.  The exclusion of these voices from the flagship journals also reflected the political science discipline’s inattention to racial equality.  He urged political scientists to “act with courage and without fear”—to “express outrage” about the injustices in the political science discipline and the broader society.

NCOBPS celebrates Barker’s life work, mentorship, and scholarship.  His death comes at an inflection point in the twenty-first century.  As street protests continue to highlight racial injustices, Black political scientists and others are pushing society, their institutions, and the discipline to address systemic inequalities.  The collective writings and leadership of Barker suggest that righteous outrage, along with the push for systemic change and disciplinary transformation, are essential to addressing the failings of the U.S. pluralist design.  We hope that his death brings forth a new call to action to develop generations of political scientists who will commit themselves to racial justice.

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Police and Vigilante Killings: Policing in the Covid-19 Era https://www.ncobps.org/police-and-vigilante-killings-policing-in-the-covid-19-era Wed, 03 Jun 2020 20:39:21 +0000 https://www.ncobps.org/?p=4553 The National Conference of Black Political Scientists (NCOBPS) condemns the police and vigilante killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, David McAtee, Tony McDade, Dreasjon Reed, James Scurlock, and countless others.  State officials have dishonored their memory, doing their utmost to signal that even in death they are under suspicion and not deserving of our unconditional love.  Those who grieve them and call for accountability and justice in their names have been beaten, mocked, shot at, driven over, and killed.  These murders are another reminder of how white supremacy, state killings, and punitive policies continue to harm Black, Brown, and Native communities.  

We have witnessed Black elected officials pepper sprayed and Black journalists arrested on camera.  We have witnessed the president encouraging gun violence in the face of mass demonstrations.  The president is not only encouraging gun violence, he is doing so using the language of segregationists while also demonizing his political opponents for standing up to the systematic devaluing of (if not attack on) Black bodies.

The events this past month raise another concern about social distancing in the COVID-19 era.  Black people as well as other people of color disproportionately live in crowded spaces and are employed in “essential” work economies where it is impossible to socially distance. Yet still, it appears that communities of color are selectively targeted by law enforcement officials for violating social distancing policies.  For example, 304 of the 375 people given citations for violating New York City’s social distancing policy from mid-March to early May were Black or Latino.  Racial disparities in the COVID-19 era are inextricably tied to the multi-generational distrust, pain, and frustration expressed in the recent protests against state violence. 

The March 28th data sharing guidelines issued by the Office of Civil Rights (OCR) at the Department of Health and Human Services presents another problem.  The guidelines allow health departments to give first responders, including police departments and sheriffs, the addresses of people testing COVID-19 positive without their permission.  With Blacks disproportionately contracting the coronavirus, the guidelines raise serious concerns about surveillance and selective enforcement. As scholars and scholar-activists, NCOBPS remains steadfast in our commitment to challenging injustices.  We stand in solidarity with communities of struggle seeking an end to state violence.  We also stand in solidarity with civil rights groups and health advocates seeking equity-based solutions in the COVID-19 era.

Sekou Franklin, President
Tiffany Willoughby-Herard, Vice-President
Kathie Stromile Golden, Executive Director

ncobps2019@gmail.com, @NCOBPSTweets

Download The Official Statement (pdf)

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African Americans and The Coronavirus: At The Intersections of Policy, Politics, and Public Health. https://www.ncobps.org/african-americans-and-the-coronavirus-at-the-intersections-of-policy-politics-and-public-health Thu, 16 Apr 2020 16:21:29 +0000 https://www.ncobps.org/?p=4476 Join NCOBPS Friday, April 17th from 3:00 – 6:00 p.m.

Topics: Blacks and public health, vote-by-mail and voting rights, U.S. Census, race and public opinion, higher education and HBCUs, Black rural communities, incarcerated persons, municipalities/cities, hip hop and social distancing, public schools and educational equity, race and poverty.

https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_V47M1-pRSUavsG-1dyqHrQ

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2020 NCOBPS CONFERENCE PRELIMINARY PROGRAM https://www.ncobps.org/2020-ncobps-conference-preliminary-program Tue, 11 Feb 2020 00:03:59 +0000 https://www.ncobps.org/?p=4005 NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF BLACK POLITICAL SCIENTISTS

2020 PROGRAM CO-CHAIRS

Keesha M. Middlemass, Howard University
Domingo Morel, Rutgers University-Newark

SECTIONS & SECTION CHAIRS

I. African and Diaspora Politics
Takiyah Harper-Shipman, Davidson College

II. Politics, Inequality, and Social Justice
Meghan Wilson, University of Chicago
Nyron Crawford, Temple University

III. Comparative Politics, International Relations, and Transnational Politics
Mai Hassan, University of Michigan
Adryan Wallace, Stony Brook University

IV. Identity Politics: Gender, Class, Ethnicity, LGBTQ+, Sexuality, Religion & Queer Politics
Lakeyta Bonnette, Georgia State University
Tamelyn Tucker-Worgs, Hood College

V. Teaching & Professional Development
Christina Rivers, DePaul University
Nadia Brown, Purdue University

VI. Undergraduate Research
Boris E. Ricks, CSU-Northridge
Teri Platt, Clark Atlanta University

VII. Political Theory & Political Philosophy
Revathi Hines, Southern University and A&M College
Keisha Lindsay, University of Wisconsin

VIII. Public Policy & Political Institutions
Natasha Christie, University of North Florida
K. Jurée Capers, Georgia State University

IX. Public Opinion and Political Participation
Davin Phoenix, UC-Irvine
Brianna Nicole Mack, Ohio Wesleyan University

X. Afro-Latino Politics
Danielle Pilar Clealand, Florida International University
2020 PRELIMINARY PROGRAM SCHEDULE

MONDAY, MARCH 9 TO WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2020

Tour of the NCOBPS Collection Clark Atlanta University Archives
9.30-10.30AM

Registration
12:00PM – 4:00PM Executive Board Room

NCOBPS Executive Council Meeting
12:00PM – 5:00PM Lenox Room

CAUCUS OR GROUP MEETING TIME
5:00PM – 6:00PM Brookhaven

Welcome & Early Bird Reception
7:00PM – 8:30PM Peachtree AB

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2020

Registration
8:00AM – 5:00PM Executive Board Room

Opening Plenary: TBD

8:00AM – 9:45AM Peachtree AB

CONCURRENT SESSION I: 10.00AM to 11.30AM

Panel 1: Considering, Challenging, and Navigating Wars on Blackness in Southern Africa

March 12, 2020, 10.00-11.30am Location: Peachtree A

Chair: Robin L Turner, Butler University, rlturne1@butler.edu

Rethinking Afrophobia in South Africa: Black Americans in the anti-apartheid struggle in the 1960s
Tiffany Willoughby-Herard, University of California, Irvine, twilloug@uci.edu

The Violence of Evictions: The Poor’s Removal from the Purview of the State in Post-Apartheid South Africa
Kira Tait, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, kira.tait@gmail.com

Black Women’s Politics in Rural Southern Africa: Governing Marginalized Communities
Robin L. Turner, Butler University, rlturne1@butler.edu

Fake News and Gendered Attacks on African Women: We Like Our Women Pretty, We Don’t Like to Hear Them Speak
Chipo Dendere, Wellesley College, cd1@wellesley.edu

Discussant: Kurt Young, Clark Atlanta University, kyoung@cau.edu

Panel 2: Evolving Moral Movements

March 12, 2020, 10.00-11.30am Location: Peachtree B

Chair: B. D’Andra Orey, Jackson State University, Byron.d.orey@jsums.edu

Street Heat in North Carolina Black Politics: The Genesis and Evolution of the Moral Mondays Movement
Jarvis Hall, North Carolina Central University, jhall@nccu.edu

A Case Study Analysis of How North Carolina’s Moral Mondays Movement Finds Strength in Diversity
Valeria Sinclair-Chapman, Purdue University, vsc@purdue.edu
India Lenear, Purdue University, ilenear@purdue.edu

Black Moral Activists: A Focus on Black Moral Activists in the Trump Era
Tamelyn Tucker-Worgs, Hood College, tuckerworgs@hood.edu
Donn Worgs, Towson University, dworgs@towson.edu

Spiritual Strivings: An Analysis of Dr. King’s use of Spirituality in his Theory of Political Action in the Civil Rights Movement
Da’Von Boyd, Yale University, davon.boyd@yale.edu

Discussant: Elizabeth Davies, University of Chicago, ejdavies@uchicago.edu

Panel 3: Theories of Black Politics

March 12, 2020, 10.00-11.30am Location: Peachtree C

Chair: Anand Comissiong, CSU-Long Beach, anand.commissiong@csulb.edu

Towards a Theory of Pan Blackness
Joseph Jones, Philander Smith College, jjones@philander.edu

The Doctrine of Nullification: Toward a New Theory of Black Politics
Albert Samuels, Southern University and A&M College, albert_samuels@subr.edu

Show Some Self-Respect:” An Analysis of President Obama’s Black Respectability Rhetoric
Williams, Stephanie, University of South Florida, swilliams@usf.edu

Discussant: TBD

Panel 4: Deconstructing Descriptive & Political Representation

March 12, 2020, 10.00-11.30am Location: Piedmont A

Chair: Matthew Platt, Morehouse College, matthew.platt@morehouse.edu

Messaging or Melanin? Disentangling Demands for Descriptive Representation and Ideological Congruence in Two Congressional Districts
Andra Gillespie, Director, James Weldon Johnson Institute, Emory University, angille@emory.edu
Kevin Sparrow (graduate student), Emory University, ksparr2@emory.edu

My Representative Looks Like Me: Intersectional Linked Fate in the 2018 Congressional Elections
Andrea Benjamin, University of Oklahoma, andrea.benjamin@ou.edu
Sydney Carr, University of Michigan, slcarr@umich.edu

“You Should Know Better”: The Consequences of Descriptive Representation
Jared Clemons, Duke University, jared.clemons@duke.edu
Julian Wamble, Stonybrook University, julian.wamble@stonybrook.edu

The Politics of Racial Representation and National Recognition: Examining Afro-Caribbean Assessments of Political Representation
Cory Gooding, University of San Diego, cgooding@sandiego.edu

Discussant: Matthew Platt, Morehouse College, matthew.platt@morehouse.edu

Panel 5: Diaspora Politics

Neoliberalism & Poverty in Gambia: The Collective Actions of the People
Haddy Njie, North Carolina State University, hmnjie@ncsu.edu

March 12, 2020, 10.00-11.30am Location: Piedmont B

Chair: Gladys Mitchell-Walthour, University of Wisconsin-Madison, mitchelg@uwm.edu

An Analysis of the Strategic Balance Between China’s Regional Hegemony and the United States’ Influence in the South China Sea: 1974 – 2016
Eslam Omar, Kentucky State University, eslam.omar@kysu.edu

Black Politics in Peru and Ecuador, 1980-2016
John Thomas, University of Chicago, jthomas3@uchicago.edu

Land Inequality, Reforms, and Political Violence: Theory and Evidence from Colombia
Marcus Johnson, CUNY Baruch College, marcus.johnson@baruch.cuny.edu
Ali Ahmed, NYU, Mateo Vasquez Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México

Whose World Order? Conceptualizing Global South Countries’ Entrance into the International Society
Claire Crawford, University of Southern California, clairecr@usc.edu

Unstable Genius: Racism, Militarism, and Howard School Theories of International Security
Sobukwe Odinga, UCLA, sodinga@afam.ucla.edu

Discussant: Danielle Pilar Clealand, Florida International University, dclealan@fiu.edu

Panel 6: Mediated Imaginations: Race, Rhetoric, and its Burden

March 12, 2020, 10.00-11.30am Location: Piedmont Ballroom

Chair: LaFleur Stephens-Dougans, Princeton University, lafleurs@princeton.edu

Polititweets: The Use of Rhetoric in Political Arenas
Meaghan Rysdale, Indiana University, meamorre@iu.edu

Typical or Stereotypical? The Influence of Stereotypes on the Media’s Coverage of Candidates
Jasmine Jackson, Purdue University, jcj121694@gmail.com

War on Black Women in Gwendolyn Brooks’ ‘Ballad of Pearl May Lee:’ Rage and Lynchings Silent Witnesses
Lashonda Carter, University of California-Irvine, lrcarter@uci.edu

Political Estrangement in Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower
Jennifer Joines, University of California, Los Angeles, EMAIL

Who Gives “The Talk”? An Examination of How Parental Status and Racial Consciousness Influence Black Parent’s Discussions about Race with Their Children
Christopher Stout, Oregon State University, stoutch@oregonstate.edu
Katherine Tate, Brown University, Katherine_tate@brown.edu

Discussant: TBD

NRBP Editorial Board Meeting

March 12, 2020, 11.45-1.15pm Location: Brookhaven

Chairs: Andra Gillespie, Emory University, angille@emory.edu
Pearl Dowe, Emory University, pearl.dowe@emory.edu

Lunch: Documentary: Rigged: The Voter Suppression Playbook

March 12, 2020, 11.45-1.15pm Location: Peachtree AB
Timothy E. Smith, Executive Producer, American Issues Initiative
Please join us for a brown bag lunch (provided by NCOBPS) and documentary on the suppression of voting rights.

CONCURRENT SESSION II
Thursday, March 12, 1.15PM to 3.00PM

Panel 7: Black Struggle for Educational Excellence

March 12, 2020, 1.15-3.00pm Location: Peachtree A

Chair: Domingo Morel, Rutgers University-Newark, domingo.morel@rutgers.edu

Fighting for the “Black Cerebral:” Black Virginians’ Struggle for Public Education, 1865-1875
Shayla Nunnally, University of Connecticut, shayla.nunnally@uconn.edu
Michael Christie, University of Connecticut, Michael.christie@uconn.edu

The Blackening of Pepperdine University
Elizabeth Craigg Walker, Claremont Graduate University, elizabeth.craigg@cgu.edu

The War on Education: Asymmetrical Warfare on the Black Community
Akil Parker, Cheyney University, akil.lateef@gmail.com

The Impact of State Funding Policies on Historically Black Colleges and University’s (HBCU): A Case Study
Melanie Johnson, UNIVERSITY, EMAIL

Discussant: Sherice Nelson, St. Mary’s College of California, drsjnelson@gmail.com

Panel 8: The Color of Change: Flipping Circuits and Clapping Back

March 12, 2020, 1.15-3.00pm Location: Peachtree B

The Color of Congress: Representation and Citizenship in Congressional Internships
James Jones, Rutgers University, Newark, james.r.jones@rutgers.edu

Chair: Brandon R. Davis, University of Kansas, davis_brandon@ku.edu

Call Outs and Clap Backs: Congresswomen of Color and Inter-branch Discourse in the Age of Trump
Najja Baptist, University of Arkansas, nbaptist@uark.edu
Guillermo Caballero, Purdue University, gcaballe@purdue.edu
Periloux C. Peay, Oklahoma University, pcpeay@ou.edu
Michael J. Simrak, Purdue University, msimrak@purdue.edu

Flipping Circuits: Trump’s War on Diversity in the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals
Adam Stone, Georgia State University, astone@gsu.edu

“Bring it Home,” Post Deracialization Strategies and the Paradox of Trump
Pearl Dowe, Emory University, pearl.dowe@emory.edu
Sekou Franklin, Middle Tennessee State University, Sekou.Franklin@mtsu.edu

Federal Courts, Voting Rights in view of the Legacy of Dr. King
Shenita Brazelton, Tuskegee University, sbrazelton@tuskegee.edu

Discussant: Brandon R. Davis, University of Kansas, davis_brandon@ku.edu

Panel 9: Protest and Change: Voting Rights & Political Participation

March 12, 2020, 1.15-3.00pm Location: Peachtree C

Chair: Andrea Benjamin, University of Oklahoma, andrea.benjamin@ou.edu

A Change is Gonna Come: A Brief Look into the Voter Education Project
LaRaven Temoney, University of Florida, l.temoney@ufl.edu

Voting Rights Act Counter-Enforcement: Republican Race War Tactics Since “Shelby v. Holder”
Adrienne Jones, Morehouse College, adrienne.jones@morehouse.edu

How Republican are Black Republicans?
Aaron L. Bell, Howard University, aaron.l.bell@gmail.com

Racial Dynamics in the American Context: A Second Century of Civil Rights and Protest?
Dianne Pinderhughes, University of Notre Dame, Pinderhughes.1@nd.edu

“Custodial Youth:” The Effect of Early Criminal Justice Contact on Political Participation
Kelly Richardson, University of Florida, kelly.richardson@ufl.edu

Discussant: Andrea Benjamin, University of Oklahoma, andrea.benjamin@ou.edu

Panel 10: Contemporary Research: Police and the Black Community

March 12, 2020, 1.15-3.00pm Location: Piedmont A

Chair: Leslie Taylor Grover, Southern University and A&M College, leslie_grover@subr.edu

African-American Police Officers’ Bias towards Other African Americans
B. D’Andra Orey, Jackson State University, Byron.d.orey@jsums.edu
Peay Periloux, Oklahoma University, pcpeay@ou.edu
Tisha Lane, Jackson State University, tisha.lane74@gmail.com

Gorillas in Our Midst: Exploring the Political Consequences of Implicit Dehumanization
Steven T. Moore, University of Michigan, stvmoore@umich.edu

The Politics of Race and the Development of the Law and Order President
Joshua Miller, Catholic University, 74millerj@cua.edu

Police Homicides of Civilians and the Politics of Counting
Ajenai Clemmons, Duke University, ajenai.clemmons@duke.edu

The Black Ice Syndrome: Deconstructing the Myth Defining the Conflicting Relationship between Black Males and Law Enforcement
Douglas Ealey, University of North Georgia, douglas.ealey@ung.edu

Discussant: Donovan Watts, Indiana University, donwatts@iu.edu

Panel 11: Race and Democracy Project: Using Other People’s Money (OTM): How to Develop a Grant Proposal & Get it Funded

March 12, 2020, 1.15-3.00pm Location: Piedmont B

Chair: David Covin, CSU-Sacramento State University, covindl@csus.edu

Danielle Pilar Clealand, Florida International University, dclealan@fiu.edu
K.C. Morrison, University of Delaware minion@udel.edu
Kathie Golden, kstromile@aol.com
Dianne Pinderhughes, Notre Dame University, Dianne.M.Pinderhughes.1@nd.edu
Gladys Mitchell-Walthour; University of Wisconsin, Madison mitchelg@uwm.edu

Panel 12: Roundtable: NCOBPS Presidential History Series – Honoring Our Legacy

March 12, 2020, 1.15-3.00pm Location: Piedmont Ballroom

Mack Jones, Professor Emeritus, Clark Atlanta University
William Daniels, Professor Emeritus, Union College
Robert Holmes, Professor Emeritus, Clark Atlanta University
Leslie McLemore, Professor Emeritus, Jackson State University

Moderator: Shiela Harmon Martin, University of the District of Columbia, smartin@udc.edu

CONCURRENT SESSION III
Thursday, March 12, 3.15PM to 5.00PM

Panel 13: The Republican Party’s War on Democracy and Equality: Why Black and Brown Communities in America Are in the Fight of Their Lives

March 12, 2020, 3.15-5.00pm Location: Peachtree A

Moderator: Albert Samuels, Southern University and A&M College, albert_samuels@subr.edu

Stephanie Williams, University of South Florida, swilliams@usf.edu
Mack Henry Jones, Ph.D. Clark Atlanta University, Professor Emeritus
Nikol G. Alexander-Floyd, Rutgers University, ngaf@womenstudies.rutgers.edu
Fernando Tormos-Aponte, University of Maryland Baltimore County, ft@umbc.edu

Panel 14: Roundtable: Professional Development: Funding Opportunities for NCOBPS Members
Co-Sponsored by the American Political Science Association (APSA)

March 12, 2020, 3.15-5.00pm Location: Peachtree B

Moderator: Janna Deitz, John W. Kluge Center, The Library of Congress, jdeitz@loc.gov

Cleopatra Warren, Ph.D., Fulbright Brazil Scholar, current Board Member, Georgia Chapter, Fulbright Association, and 1998 NCOBPS Fellowship Awardee
Jesse J. Holland, Distinguished Visiting Scholar In Residence, John W. Kluge Center jesse@jessejholland.com (Award-winning writer and journalist of The Black Panther: Who Is The Black Panther? and The Invisibles: The Untold Story of African American Slavery Inside The White House)
Kim Mealy, Senior Director of Diversity and Inclusion Programs, American Political Science Association (APSA), kmealy@apsanet.org, www.apsanet.org/diversityprograms

Panel 15: The Elections and Governance of Black Female Mayors

March 12, 2020, 3.15-5.00pm Location: Peachtree C

Chair: Jared Clemons, Duke University, jared.clemons@duke.edu

Between a Rock and a Hard Place: The Impact of Race and Gender on the Local Governing Styles of Black Women Mayors in Gary, Indiana and Cambridge, Maryland
Regina Moorer, Alabama State University, rmoorer@alasu.edu

Black Female Mayoral Re-Elections in Savannah and San Antonio
Briana Hyman, Howard University

Project Power: Understanding the Campaigns and Economic Development Strategies Black Female Politicians Pursue
Jessica Stewart, Emory University

Mayor London Breed of San Francisco
James L. Taylor, University of San Francisco

The Campaigns, Elections, and Governance of Black Female Mayors
Sharon Austin, University of Florida, polssdw@polisci.ufl.edu

Mayor Lori Lightfoot and the Defeat of the Chicago Political Machine
Valerie Johnson, Depaul University

Discussant: Sharon Austin, University of Florida, polssdw@polisci.ufl.edu

Panel 16: Undergraduate Research: An In-Depth Analysis of the Social, Economic, and Political Structure in Cities

March 12, 2020, 3.30-5.00pn Location: Piedmont Ballroom

Chair: Dr. Tammy Greer, Clark Atlanta University and Atlanta Metropolitan State College, tammy.greer@yahoo.com

Dr. Greer will provide students’ names

Discussant: TBD

Panel 17: War on Working Black People

March 12, 2020, 3.15-5.00pm Location: Piedmont A

Chair: Caroline Shenaz Hossein, York University, Toronto, Canada, chossein@yorku.ca

The African Jamaican Working-Class and the Sugar Workers’ Cooperatives: Challenging the Racist-Cum Capitalist Political Economy
Ajamu Nangwaya, University of West Indies, Jamaica, anangwaya@gmail.com

The Banker Ladies: Black Women Grounding Business in the Collective in the Americas
Caroline Shenaz Hossein, York University, Toronto, Canada, chossein@yorku.ca

Under-Representation of the Black Community in the Formal Cooperative Sector in Canada
Ushnish Sengupta, University of Toronto, ushnish.sengupta@gmail.com

Racial Capitalism & the Color of Accumulation in Global Africa – Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow
Darryl C. Thomas, Pennsylvania State University, dct10@psu.edu

Discussant: TBD

Panel 18: Towards a New Politics of Pan-Africanism

March 12, 2020, 3.15-5.00pm Location: Piedmont B

Chair: TBD

The Power & Promise of Pan African Ideals, Values & Knowledge
Noel Whelchel, Clark Atlanta University, nwhelchel@cau.edu

The Forces & Sources of Unity: Towards a New Synthesis for Pan-Africanism
Kurt Young, Clark Atlanta University, kyoung@cau.edu

War on Pan-Africanism: 9-11, ADOS, and the Modern Presidency
Kiyadh Burt, Hope Policy Institute, kiyadh.burt@hope-ec.org
Dalitso Ruwe, Wittenburg University, ruwed@wittenburg@edu

Hashtag ADOS [#ADOS] and the “War” of Gerrymandering Black American Identity: How is Political Activism and the National Debate on Reparations Shaping Public Policy and What it Means to be “Black” in America
Theodore Harrison, University of Oregon, theoh@uoregon.edu

The Pan African Federalist Movement in North America
Edward Brown (aka Baba Mwalimu K-Q Amsata), unitedafrica2020@aol.com

Discussant: Stephen Graves, University of Missouri, gravessc@missouri.edu

SPECIAL EVENT: LGBTQ Safe Space Training & Workshop

March 12, 2020, 3.30-5.30pm Location: Brookhaven

Organizer: Jerome Hunt, Long Beach City College, jhunt@lbcc.edu

Seats are limited. The Safe Space Training & Workshop is open to the first 20 people who email the LGBTQ+ Caucus at lgbtqcaucus.ncobps@gmail.com to reserve a seat. Admission is free.

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, EVENING ACTIVITIES

NCOBPS General Business Meeting Peachtree AB
5:30PM – 6:30PM

ASBWP General Business Meeting Brookhaven
6:30PM – 7:30PM

Reception Peachtree AB
Co-Sponsored by the Black Rural Project
7.00-8.30PM

FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2020

Registration
8:00AM – 5:00PM Executive Board Room

CONCURRENT SESSION IV
Friday, March 13, 8.00-9.45am

Panel 19: Black Candidates, Campaigns & Engagement

March 13, 2020, 8.00-9.45am Location: Peachtree A

Chair: Lorrie Frasure, University of California, Los Angeles, lfrasure@polisci.ucla.edu

Untangling the effects of Race and Legislative Behavior on Constituent Attitudes
Matthew Platt, Morehouse College, matthew.platt@morehouse.edu

Reflection of the 2018 Georgia Mid-Term Election
William Boone, Clark Atlanta University, boone.william@gmail.com
Tammy Greer, Clark Atlanta University and Atlanta Metropolitan State College, tammy.greer@yahoo.com

Minority Density and Political Involvement (MD ↔ PI): A Framework that Integrates Multiple Bodies of Research
Ray Block, Pennsylvania State University, rblock@psu.edu

Campaign and Issue Positioning of Black Female Candidates in the Context of Societal Stereotyping
Jessica Carew, Elon University, jcarew@elon.edu

Propelling Black Political Leaders: A Case Study of Florida’s Black Political Leaders
Paul Jackson, Jr., University of Wisconsin-Madison, jacksonii@wisc.edu

The ‘Twoness’ Advantage: Examining Black v. Black LGBTQ Campaigns
Ravi Perry, Howard University, ravi.perry@howard.edu

Discussant: Julian Wamble, Stonybrook University, julian.wamble@stonybrook.edu

Panel 20: Roundtable: Race and Democracy Project: The Collaborative Study of Race in the Americas

March 13, 2020, 8.00-9.45am Location: Peachtree B

Moderator: David Covin, CSU-Sacramento State University, covindl@csus.edu

K.C. Morrison, University of Delaware, minion@udel.edu
Kathie Golden, kstromile@aol.com
Dianne Pinderhughes, Notre Dame University, Dianne.M.Pinderhughes.1@nd.edu
Cloves Oliveira
James Steele

Panel 21: Framing Police Violence & Outrage

March 13, 2020, 8.00-9.45am Location: Peachtree C

Chair: David Knight, University of Chicago, djknight@uchicago.edu

Social and Political Responses to Police Violence
Brianna Mack, Ohio Wesleyan University, bnmack@owu.edu
Brad Holland, University of Hawaii-Hilo, holland8@hawaii.edu

Brewing Outrage: The Role of Sympathy in Shaping the Political Response to Police Shootings
Gabrielle Gray, Howard University gabrielle.gray@bison.howard.edu

If We Don’t Do It, Who Will? Combatting State and Community Violence in Greater Englewood
Justin Zimmerman, Northwestern University, justinzimmerman2022@u.northwestern.edu

Trust the Experts, the Only Experts: Police Labor Organizations and the Politics of Extrajudicial State Violence
Bryan Carter (graduate student), Johns Hopkins University, bcarte33@jhu.edu

Analyzing the Applicability of the Patrol-Alarm Mode of Oversight in Explaining Successful Police Reform in the United States
Alexander Goodwin, University of North Texas, AlexanderGoodwin@my.unt.edu

Discussant: Douglas Ealey, University of North Georgia, douglas.ealey@ung.edu

Panel 22: White Racial Attitudes

March 13, 2020, 8.00-9.45am Location: Piedmont A

Chair: Steven T. Moore, University of Michigan, stvmoore@umich.edu

White Supremacist and Racist Opinion, 1940s-2018: A New Look at the Data
Robert C. Smith, San Francisco State University, rcs@sfsu.edu
Richard Seltzer, Howard University, rseltzer@howard.edu

The Politics of Skin Color: Exploring Whites’ Evaluations of Black Political Candidates
Nicole Yadon, University of Michigan, nyadon@umich.edu

Mapping Anti-Blackness from Sea to Shining Sea
Princess Williams, University of Michigan, princesh@umich.edu
Camille Burge, Villanova University, camille.burge@villanova.edu

Paying the Price? White Liberals’ Conditional Support for Racial Justice
Jared Clemons, Duke University, jared.clemons@duke.edu

Discussant: Cory Gooding, University of San Diego, cgooding@sandiego.edu

Panel 23: Roundtable: Students Sowing Democracy: The North Carolina HBCU Participatory Redistricting Project (PRP)

March 13, 2020, 8.00-9.45am Location: Piedmont B

Chair: Jarvis Hall, North Carolina Central University, jhall@nccu.edu

Fred McBride, Redistricting & Voting Rights Policy Specialist, Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law

North Carolina Central University Students:
Jazmyne Abney
Jaleel Graves
Imani Johnson
Brendon Peay

Discussant: Artemesia Stanberry, North Carolina Central University, astanberry@nccu.edu

Panel 24: Roundtable: Teaching the Politics of Race at Predominantly White Colleges and Universities: Challenges and Best Practices

March 12, 2020, 8.00-9.45am Location: Piedmont Ballroom

Moderator: Emmitt Y. Riley III, DePauw University, emmittriley@depauw.edu

Emmitt Y. Riley III, DePauw University, emmittriley@depauw.edu
Clarissa Peterson, DePauw University, cpeterson@depauw.edu
Valerie C. Johnson, DePaul University, Valerie.c.johnson@depaul.edu
Nyron Crawford, Temple University, nyron.crawford@temple.edu

CONCURRENT SESSION V
Friday, March 13, 10.00-11.45am

Panel 25: Roundtable: Mack Jones & the “Atlanta School” of Black Political Science: Contemporary Questions, Debates & Contributions

March 13, 2020, 10.00-11.45am Location: Peachtree A

Moderator: Rickey Hill, Department of Political Science, Jackson State University

Kurt Young, Clark Atlanta University, Department of Political Science
Kelly Harris, Africana Studies Program, Seton Hall University
Afia Zakiya, Congressional Black Caucus Foundation
Joseph Jones, Department of Political Science, Philander Smith College, jjones@philander.edu
Hashim Gibrill, Department of Political Science, Clark Atlanta University, Hashim Gibrill, Clark Atlanta University, hgibrill@cau.edu

Panel 26: Critical Political Economies: Radical Alternatives and Possibilities

March 13, 2020, 10.00-11.45am Location: Peachtree B

Discussant: T. D. Harper-Shipman, Davidson College, taharpershipman@davidson.edu

Dying for Life: Necro-Economics and Reproduction in Ghana
T. D. Harper-Shipman, Davidson College, taharpershipman@davidson.edu

Communal Land Titles, Land Trusts & Shared Land Stewardship
Kia Melchor Hall, Fielding Graduate University, khall.sis14@gmail.com

Theorizing Radical Africana Political Economy
Charisse Burden-Stelly, Carleton College, cburden@carleton.edu

Solidarity Economy Praxis in Limonade: Reintellecting Woman as Subject
Mamyrah Dougé-Prosper, Davidson College, madougeprosper@davidson.edu

Panel 27: Roundtable: African American LGBTQ+ Activism/Movement Building in the Trump Era in Atlanta, Georgia

March 13, 2020, 10.00-11.45am Location: Peachtree C

Moderator: Jerome Hunt, Long Beach City College, jhunt@lbcc.edu

Tonya M. Williams, Cosumnes River College, WilliaL3@crc.losrios.edu

Panel 28: Author Meets Critics: Steadfast Democrats by Ismail K. White and Chryl N. Laird

March 13, 2020, 10.00-11.45am Location: Piedmont A

Moderator: Julian Wamble, Stony Brook, julian.wamble@stonybrook.edu

Ismail K. White, Duke University, ismail.white@duke.edu
Chryl N. Laird, Bowdoin College, claird@bowdoin.edu
Candis Watts Smith, Pennsylvania State University, cwsmith@psu.edu
Ray Block, Pennsylvania State University, rjb6233@psu.edu
Todd Shaw, University of South Carolina, shawtc@mailbox.sc.edu

Panel 29: Roundtable: Professional Development: The Editors’ Guide to Getting Your Research Published

March 13, 2020, 10.00-11.45am Location: Piedmont B

Moderator: Sharon Austin, University of Florida, Incoming Editor of the American Political Science Review

Nadia Brown, Purdue University, brown957@purdue.edu, Politics, Groups, and Identities
Pearl Ford Dowe, Emory University, pearl.dowe@emory.edu, National Review of Black Politics
Andra Gillespie, Emory University, angille@emory.edu, National Review of Black Politics
Valeria Sinclair-Chapman, Purdue University, vsc@purdue.edu, Politics, Groups, and Identities & Incoming Editor of the American Political Science Review

Panel 30: Educating at the Margins? Policy, Identity, and Future Consideration

March 13, 2020, 10.00-11.45am Location: Piedmont Ballroom

Chair: Valeria Sinclair-Chapman, Purdue University, vsc@purdue.edu

The Politics of a LGBTQ+ Classroom
Gabriela Corona Valencia, University of California, Los Angeles, gcoronav1995@ucla.edu

How Resilient Black Men Enrolled in STEM Ph.D. Programs Navigate, Negotiate, and Respond to Racism in the Ivory Tower
Breauna Spencer, UC Irvine, EMAIL

Proper Funding for Historical Black Colleges and Universities as a Pillar of Reparations
Sherice Nelson, St. Mary’s College of California, drsjnelson@gmail.com

Democrats v. Republicans: Which Party Is Best For Black Homeownership?
Kendrick Roberson, University of Southern California, kbrobers@usc.edu

AB-705: Eliminating the Educational Gap?
Elizabeth Craigg Walker, Claremont Graduate University, elizabeth.craigg@cgu.edu

Discussant: Tammy Greer, Clark Atlanta University & Atlanta Metropolitan State College, tammy.greer@yahoo.com

LUNCH FOR STUDENTS ONLY (Undergraduate & Graduate Students)

CO-SPONSORED BY THE AMERICAN POLITICAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION
Friday, March 13, 11.45 to 1.00PM

APSA President Paula McClain Location: TBD

LUNCH ON YOUR OWN
11.45-1.00pm

CONCURRENT SESSION VI
Friday, March 13, 1.00PM to 2.45PM

Panel 31: Roundtable: Do We Dare Charge Genocide? Have Public Policies Been Used to Wage War Against Black People?

March 12, 2020, 1.00-2.45pm Location: Peachtree A

Moderator: Artemesia Stanberry, North Carolina Central University, astanberry@nccu.edu

Jarvis Hall, North Carolina Central University, jhall@nccu.edu
Artemesia Stanberry, North Carolina Central University, astanberry@nccu.edu

North Carolina Central University Undergraduate Students
Akelo L. Agingu
Jaleel D. Graves
Jayla Gittens
Jordan M. Thomas

Panel 32: Creating New Terms of Agreement in Africa

March 13, 2020, 1.00-2.45pm Location: Peachtree B

Chair: TBD

Livelihoods in the Slums of Kenya: A Case Study on Perspectives of Experts and Slum Dwellers
Angela Pashayan (graduate student), Howard University, angela.pashayan@bison.howard.edu
Richard Seltzer, Howard University. rseltzer@howard.edu

Towards a Federal Constitution for the United African States
Edward Brown (aka Baba Mwalimu K-Q Amsata), unitedafrica2020@aol.com

Beyond Learning Outcomes to Life Outcomes: Implications of Post-Secondary Education on Market and Non-Market Outcomes in Nigeria
Kyela Gadi (graduate student), Georgia State University, kgadi1@student.gsu.edu

Botswana: Creating an Oasis in the Kalahari
Richmond Danso, Howard University, rdanso.danso@gmail.com

Discussant: TBD

Panel 33: Fighting For Our Lives

March 13, 2020, 1.00-2.45pm Location: Peachtree C

Chair: Ravi Perry, Howard University, ravi.perry@howard.edu

“For Your Gay Brothers and Your Gay Sisters in Jail”: Shame and Repentance in Sylvia Rivera’s Jeremiad
Lisa Beard, West Washington University, bearde@wwu.edu

LGBT Inclusive Language and the Justice for Victims of Lynching Act: A Comparative Legislative History
Michael J. Simrak, Purdue University, msimrak@purdue.edu

Legislating Action: The Reactionary Changes to State Law Creating Stricter Regulations for Protest and Free Speech Privileges in Black Communities
Marshall Allen, University of Missouri, matk7@mail.missouri.edu

Discussant: Ravi Perry, Howard University, ravi.perry@howard.edu

Panel 34: Politics of Black Space

March 13, 2020, 1.00-2.45pm Location: Piedmont A

Chair: Tamelyn Tucker-Worgs, Hood College, tuckerworgs@hood.edu

Determinants of Black Attitudes towards Reparations for Slavery in the U.S.
Brooke Abrams, University of New Mexico, babrams@unm.edu
Kathy Powers, University of New Mexico & Georgetown University, kpowers1@unm.edu
Gabriel Sanchez, University of New Mexico, sanchezg@unm.edu

Truth and Reconciliation: A Suggestion for Step One of the U.S. Reparations Movement
Monique Gamble, University of the District of Columbia, mgamble@udc.edu

Environmental Genocide and Black Rural Life
Chaz Briscoe, University of California, Irvine, cbriscoe@uci.edu

Black and Blue in the Red Stick: The Hell Summer of 2016 in Baton Rouge
Leslie Taylor Grover, Southern University and A&M College, leslie_grover@subr.edu

Black and White Images of Crime and Violence on St. Louis Local Television News
Michael Strawbridge, Purdue University, mstrawbr@purdue.edu
Rosalee Clawson, Purdue University, clawsonr@purdue.edu

Discussant: Christopher Stout, Oregon State University, stoutch@oregonstate.edu

Panel 35: Black Politics and Inclusion in Latin America and the Caribbean

March 13, 2020, 1.00-2.45pm Location: Piedmont B

Chair: John Thomas, University of Chicago, jthomas3@uchicago.edu

Black Political Support of the Cuban Revolution
Danielle Pilar Clealand, Florida International University, dclealan@fiu.edu

Communists Wearing Panties”: The Committee of Women for Progress Defining Revolutionary Politics in Jamaica
Maziki Thame, Clark Atlanta University, mthame@cau.edu

Intersectional Blackness: Afro-Brazilian Bolsa Familia Beneficiaries’ Experiences and Political Opinions
Gladys Mitchell-Walthour, University of Wisconsin, Madison mitchelg@uwm.edu

Intersectional Synthesis: A Case Study of the Colectiva Feminista en Construcción
Fernando Tormos-Aponte, University of Maryland Baltimore County, ft@umbc.edu

Discussant: Noel Whelchel, Clark Atlanta University, nwhelchel@cau.edu

Panel 36: Roundtable: The 50th Anniversary of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies

March 13, 2020, 1.00-2.45pm Location: Piedmont Ballroom

Moderator: Sekou Franklin, Middle Tennessee State University, Sekou.Franklin@mtsu.edu

Dianne Pinderhughes, University of Notre Dame, Pinderhughes.1@nd.edu
LaShonda Brenson, Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, lashonda@jointcenter.org

Poster Session 1

Co-Sponsored by:
Pi Sigma Alpha
James Weldon Johnson Institute, Emory University (Dr. Andra Gilliespie)

March 13, 2020, 1.00-2.45pm Location: Ballroom Foyer

Crime News and Racial Stereotype Priming
Sebree Warrington, University of Arkansas, wesebree@uark.edu

Racing the Messenger: The Effect of Racial Cues on Blacks’ Political Attitudes
Zoe Walker, University of Michigan, zcwalker@umich.edu

African American Women in the Workplace
Kaylin Oliver, University of Arkansas, kdoliver@email.uark.edu

The Effect of Cultural Heterogeneity on Black Americans’ Political Behavior and Attitudes
Tolulope Babalola, USC, babalola@usc.edu

Discussants: NCOBPS Members

CONCURRENT SESSION VII
Friday, March 13, 2020, 3.00-4.45pm

Panel 37: Author Meets Critics: American While Black: African Americans, Immigration, and the Limits of Citizenship by Niambi Carter (Oxford University Press, 2019)

March 13, 2020, 3.00-4.45pm Location: Peachtree A

Moderator: Najja Baptist, University of Arkansas, nbaptist@uark.edu

Niambi Carter, Howard University, niambi.carter@howard.edu
Sekou Franklin, Middle Tennessee State University, Sekou.Franklin@mtsu.edu
Andra Gillespie, Emory University, angille@emory.edu
Shayla Nunnally, University of Connecticut, shayla.nunnally@uconn.edu

Panel 38: Articulations of Women and Their Labor

March 13, 2020, 3.00-4.45pm Location: Peachtree B

Chair: Tiffany Willoughby-Herard, University of California, Irvine, twilloug@uci.edu

Voices Unheard, Stories Untold: Black Women, Police Violence and Political Participation
Ayana Best, University of Southern California, ayanabes@usc.edu

The Generational Difference: Police Perceptions, Political Attitudes, and African American Youth
Donovan Watts, Indiana University, donwatts@iu.edu

The Politics of Black and Latinx Mother(hood)
Gabriela Corona Valencia, University of California, Los Angeles, gcoronav1995@ucla.edu
April Jackson, Claremont University, EMAIL

Black Mothers, the Problem That Never Was: How U.S. Policies and Politics Undermined Black Mothers to Weaken the Black Family Unit
Artemesia Stanberry, North Carolina Central University, astanberry@nccu.edu

Black Women and Labor/Movement
Anand Comissiong, California State University Long Beach, anand.commissiong@csulb.edu

Discussant: Stephen Graves, University of Missouri, gravessc@missouri.edu

Panel 39: Examining the “Afro” in Latino and Caribbean Politics in the U.S.

March 13, 2020, 3.00-4.45pm Location: Peachtree C

Chair: TBD

Northern Migrations of Latin American Race Ideologies
Tanya K. Hernandez, Fordham University, thernandez@law.fordham.edu

Pan-Africanism, the Emerging Self-Identification of Afro-Latinx Americans, and the Sequent Political Impacts
Briana Hyman, University of Arkansas, bhyman@email.uark.edu

Dominican Political Incorporation in the U.S.
Yalidy Matos, Rutgers University, yalidy.matos@rutgers.edu
Domingo Morel, Rutgers Universtiy-Newark, domingo.morel@rutgers.edu

Different Nations Within: Re-examining the Dimensions of Ethnic Nationalism among African Americans and Latina/os
Todd Shaw, University of South Carolina, shawtc@mailbox.sc.edu
Robert Brown, Spelman College, rbrown61@spelman.edu

Discussant: TBD

Panel 40: Roundtable: Professional Development: Tenure and Promotion
Co-Sponsored by the American Political Science Association (APSA)

March 13, 2020, 3.00-4.45pm Location: Piedmont Ballroom

Chair: Pearl Ford Dowe, Emory University, pearl.dowe@emory.edu

Valeria Sinclair-Chapman, Purdue University, vsc@purdue.edu
Lorrie Frasure, University of California, Los Angeles, lfrasure@polisci.ucla.edu
Errol Henderson, Pennsylvania State University
Ray Block, Pennsylvania State University, rjb6233@psu.edu

Panel 41: The Black Agenda & Racial Consciousness in the 21st Century

March 13, 2020, 3.00-4.45pm Location: Piedmont A

Chair: Shayla Nunnally, University of Connecticut, shayla.nunnally@uconn.edu

Is there a Black Agenda?
Tammy Greer, Clark Atlanta University & Atlanta Metropolitan State College, tammy.greer@yahoo.com

Black Lives Matter … I Think
Crystal Robertson, UCLA crystalrob@ucla.edu

Connecting HIV Prevention with the Opioid Crisis: Attitudinal and Policy Implications of Shifting HIV Prevention Messages from a POC, LGBTQ frame to a White, Drug Use Frame
Briana Mack, Ohio Wesleyan University, bnmack12@gmail.com
Phokeng M. Dailey, Ohio Wesleyan University, pmdailey@owu.edu

Invisible Weapons: Agenda-Setting and Cooptation in a Neoliberal Era
Marcus Board, Georgetown University, marcus.board@georgetown.edu

Church of Black Voters: Church and Religion in Blacks’ Democratic Party Affiliations
Christopher Stout, Oregon State University, stoutch@oregonstate.edu
Katherine Tate, Brown University
Meghan Wilson, University of Chicago, mewilson@uchicago.edu

Discussant: Jessica Carew, Elon University, jcarew@elon.edu

Panel 42: Racial Identity & Ideologies

March 13, 2020, 3.00-4.45pm Location: Piedmont B

Chair: Nicole Yadon, University of Michigan, nyadon@umich.edu

Black Nationalism and Conservative African American Solutions
Stephen Graves, University of Missouri, gravessc@missouri.edu

Between Blackness and Islam: Black Muslim Political Behavior
Nura Sedique, Princeton University, nsediqe@princeton.edu

Unpacking Multiraciality as a Political Identity
Gregory Leslie (graduate student), University of California-Los Angeles, gregoryjohnleslie@gmail.com

How Judgments of Belonging and Citizenship Shape Young Black Americans’ Political Identities
Ana E. Jones, Syracuse University, aejones@syr.edu
Jenn Jackson, Syracuse University, jjacks37@maxwell.syr.edu

Minority Legislators, Majority Views: Race, Partisanship, and Incumbent Congressional Job
Emmitt Y. Riley III, Depauw University, emmittriley@depauw.edu
Clarissa Peterson, Depauw University, cpeterson@depauw.edu

Discussant: Adrienne Jones, Morehouse College, adrienne.jones@morehouse.edu

Poster Session 2

Co-Sponsored by:
Pi Sigma Alpha
James Weldon Johnson Institute, Emory University (Dr. Andra Gilliespie)

March 13, 2020, 3.00-4.45pm Location: Ballroom Foyer

Race, Violence, and Mental Illness
Kendall Chan, Emory University, Kendall.chan@emory.edu

Sociopolitical Stressors and Preterm Births in African Americans in Virginia: 1 September 2015 to 31 August 2017
Anessha Maini, Emory University, Aneesha.maini@emory.edu

Media Racial Bias: A Study of Kamala Harris’ Two Campaigns
Tate Stevenson, Emory University, Tate.elijah.stevenson@emory.edu

Mariah Parker, Black Radicalism and Athens-Clarke County
Adesola Thomas, Emory University, adesola.thomas@emory.edu

Discussants: NCOBPS Members

APSA Committee on the Status of Blacks – Spring Meeting

March 13, 2020, 3.00-4.45pm Location: Brookhaven

Contact: Kim Mealy, APSA, Senior Director of Diversity and Inclusion Programs (www.apsanet.org/diversityprograms), kmealy@apsanet.org

NCOBPS Founder’s Symposium

March 13, 2020, 5.00-6.00pm Location: Peachtree AB

Friday, March 13, Evening Activities

NCOBPS President’s Reception Peachtree AB
Sekou Franklin, NCOBPS President
Paula McClain, APSA President
Steven Smith, Executive Director of APSA
6.00-7.00

NCOBPS Awards Banquet featuring _____
7.00PM – 10:00PM Peachtree AB

SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2020

Registration Executive Board Room
8:00AM – 12:00PM

ASBWP Networking Breakfast
8.30-9.45am TBD

LGBTQ Caucus Meeting

March 14, 2020, 8.30-9.45am Location: Brookhaven

Contact: Jerome Hunt, Long Beach City College, jhunt@lbcc.edu

CAUCUS OR GROUP MEETING TIME

March 14, 2020, 8.30-9.45am Location: TBD

Contact:

CONCURRENT SESSION VIII
Friday, March 13, 2020, 10.00AM to 11.45AM

Panel 43: Policing in Black & White: The Stigmatization of Black Bodies

March 14, 2020, 10.00-11.45am Location: Peachtree A

Chair: Joshua Miller, Catholic University, 74millerj@cua.edu

Policing Hate: Bias-Motivated Crime in the Aftermath of Police Violence
Kiela Crabtree, University of Michigan, crabtka@umich.edu

To Protect or Police: Minority Threat and the Expectation of Police Intervention in Social Movement Protests
Periloux Peay, University of Oklahoma, pcpeay@ou.edu
Tyler Camarillo, University of Oklahoma, tyler.camarillo@ou.edu

Beyond Brutality: The Impact of Police Discrimination on Linked Fate among African Americans in the U.S.
Brooke Abrams, University of New Mexico babrams@unm.edu

Black Youth and the Carceral State: Reimagining America’s Mass Imprisonment Generation
David Knight, University of Chicago, djknight@uchicago.edu

Engaging College Students in 21st Century Policing
Elsie L. Scott, Ronald Walters Leadership and Public Policy Center, Howard University, elsie.scott@howard.edu

Discussant: Joshua Miller, Catholic University, 74millerj@cua.edu

Panel 44: Black Women, Politics, and Elected Office

March 14, 2020, 10.00-11.45am Location: Peachtree B

Chair: Pearl Dowe, Emory University, pearl.dowe@emory.edu

Intersectional Representation: A Framework for Studying Black Congresswomen
Rolda Darlington, University of Florida, rolly713@ufl.edu

Delayed But Not Denied: The Election of the First Black Mayor of Montgomery, Alabama
Regina M. Moorer, Alabama State University, rmoorer@alasu.edu

Black Women’s Motivation to Run and the Infrastructure Behind Them
Jamil Scott, Georgetown University, jamil.scott@georgetown.edu

Home is Where the Heart Is: Black Women and their Communal Quest for Change
Eugene Johnson, Louisiana State University, ejoh138@lsu.edu

Discussant: Nadia Brown, Purdue University, brown957@purdue.edu

Panel 45: Economic Anxiety: Race, Welfare, and Social Policies

March 14, 2020, 10.00-11.45am Location: Peachtree C

Chair: Breanca Merritt, Indiana University, Public Policy Institute, breanca@iupui.edu

A Rose By Any Other Name?
LaFleur Stephens-Dougans, Princeton University, lafleurs@princeton.edu

No Strangers to Hardship: African Americans, Poverty, and Politics of Resilience
Christine Slaughter, University of California, Los Angeles, christine.slaughter@ucla.edu

The Poor, The Needy, and The Partisan: How do State-Level Political Factors Influence Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program Benefits
Naomi Nubin (graduate student), University of Houston, naomi_nubin@yahoo.com

Cadillac Queens: An Analysis of Welfare Stigma and Its Effect on CalFresh Program Participation
Alexandria Davis (undergraduate student), UCLA, alexjdavis29@gmail.com

Discussant: Breanca Merritt, Indiana University, Public Policy Institute, breanca@iupui.edu

Panel 46: The Activist Movement

March 14, 2020, 10.00-11.45am Location: Piedmont A

Chair: Valeria Sinclair-Chapman, Purdue University, vsc@purdue.edu

Wartime Athletic Peace: Black Athlete Activism, Protest…Revolution?
Justin Garner, Alabama A&M University, justin.garner@aamu.edu
Tarale Murry, University of Michigan, murrytg@umich.edu

“I Am More Than an Athlete”: Examining the Backlash Against Black Athletes as Political Actors.
Lorriane Nicole Nance (undergraduate student), lnnance@uci.edu

And When They Wake-Up”: Black Lives Matter, Rap, and Activism
Najja Baptist, University of Arkansas, nbaptist@uark.edu

From Adherents to Activists: The Process of Social Movement Mobilization
Elizabeth Davies, University of Chicago, ejdavies@uchicago.edu

Revisiting and Mobilizing the Political Organizing History of the National Association of Wage Earners (NAWE)
Danielle Phillips-Cunningham, Texas Woman’s University, dphillips3@twu.edu

Discussant: TBD

Panel 47: Graduate Student Research

March 14, 2020, 10.00-11.45am Location: Piedmont B

Chair: Meghan Wilson, University of Chicago, mewilson@uchicago.edu

Examining How First Generation Americans Vote on Immigration Policies
Honor Donnie, Clark Atlanta University, honordonnie@gmail.com

Equalizing Gun Control
Jaelyn Jackson, Ohio University-Lancaster, jj537919@ohio.edu

Historic Firsts in U.S. Elections, the Case of Jahana Hayes
Aaron Hooker, University of Connecticut, aaron.hooker@uconn.edu
Evelyn Simien, University of Connecticut, evelyn.simien@uconn.edu

Goodbye Chocolate City: The War on Black DC
Ruby Branscomb, University of the District of Columbia
Benjamin Hoffshcneider, University of the District of Columbia
Shermaine Keyes, University of the District of Columbia
Randell Thomas, University of the District of Columbia

Examining Black and White Millennials Trust In Government
Kayla Thompson, Depauw University, kaylathompson_2022@depauw.edu
Shafrarisi Bonner, Depauw University, EMAIL

Discussants: Meghan Wilson, University of Chicago, mewilson@uchicago.edu

Panel 48: Racial & Ethnic Politics in the U.S. (Graduate Students)

March 14, 2020, 10.00-11.45am Location: Piedmont Ballroom

Chair: Andra Gillespie, Emory University, angille@emory.edu

Beyond Marriage Equality: Are LGBT Non-profit Organizations Doing Enough for LGBT Communities of Color?
Clark Brinson, Emory University, Clark.brinson@emory.edu

An Intersectional, Life Course Approach to Understanding Health Disparities
Emily Dore, Emory University, Emily.catherine.dore@emory.edu

Our Vote, Our Voice: Descriptive Political Representation, Race, and Nativity.
Michaela Jenkins, Emory University, Michaela.jenkins@emory.edu

Discussant: Ray Block, Pennsylvania State University, rblock@psu.edu

Panel 49: Roundtable: The LGBTQ+ Caucus Presents: A Discussion with African American LGBTQ+ Elected Officials

March 14, 2020, 10.00-11.45am Location: TBD

Moderator: Jerome Hunt, Long Beach City College, jhunt@lbcc.edu

Ravi Perry, Howard University, ravi.perry@howard.edu

Closing Plenary: NCOBPS President Sekou Franklin
2021 Co-Program Chairs
12.00-1.30pm Peachtree AB

“A Tribute to Dr. Mack Jones” Ceremony
2.00pm-5.00pm Atlanta University Center (AUC)
Robert W. Woodruff Library


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

NCOBPS would like to thank the following co-sponsor for their support of its 51st Annual Meeting:

Get Ready for APSA 2020!

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

NCOBPS would like to thank the following co-sponsors for their support of its 51st Annual Meeting:

Call for Papers 52nd Annual Meeting of the
National Conference of Black Political Scientists

March 2021
LOCATION

TITLE

Conference Program Co-Chairs

Local Arrangements Committee Chair

Paper proposals will be due in the fall. Consult www.ncobps.org for more information.


NOTES

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National Conference of Black Political Scientists Expresses Solidarity with Afro-Brazilians and the US Network for Democracy in Brazil https://www.ncobps.org/national-conference-of-black-political-scientists-expresses-solidarity-with-afro-brazilians-and-the-us-network-for-democracy-in-brazil Thu, 02 Jan 2020 20:01:00 +0000 https://www.ncobps.org/?p=3453 The National Conference of Black Political Scientists (NCOBPS) has worked on solidarity initiatives with Afro-Brazilians for the past three decades. Much of this work has been coordinated by the Race and Democracy project of NCOBPS. Several NCOBPS members are also active in the US Network for Democracy in Brazil (USNDB). Recently, there has been a wave of violence against Afro-Brazilians that has accelerated during the presidency of Jair Bolsonaro. In solidarity with Black Brazilians, NCOBPS expresses support of the following USNDB statement on transnational black solidarity. 

Transnational Black Solidarity Statement The Afro-Brazilian Committee of the United States Network for Democracy in Brazil is expressing transnational outrage at the increasing violation of human rights in Brazil, especially the recent death of Agatha Felix, an eight-year-old girl who was shot and killed by police in Rio de Janeiro. Fifty-four percent of the Brazilian population is Afro-Brazilian. Despite the size of the population, their lives are under threat. We are most concerned with the following issues: The Anti-Crime Bill, the passing of legislation of DNA collection for those accused of crimes, and the Alcântara Accord. 

Our first concern is police violence and executions of Afro-Brazilians. Between January and August 2019, over 1200 people in the state of Rio de Janeiro were killed by police and over 70 percent of those killed were Afro-Brazilian. In contrast, 602 people were killed by police in the United States in the same time period. For an even starker contrast, between 2015 and 2016, 5,811 blacks were killed by police in Brazil compared to 992 people who were killed by police in the USA in 2018. The Anti-Crime Bill is touted as a bill to crack down on gangs. However, too often Black Brazilians are viewed as criminals and innocent people are killed as a result. The Anti-Crime Bill is dangerous as it will lead to an increase in police executions of Black Brazilians. Agatha Felix’s death is an example of the horrific result of militarization of low-income neighborhoods and the danger of the Anti-Crime Bill. Agatha is one of five children killed by the police in Rio de Janeiro this year. 

Our second concern is the collection of genetic material of people accused of crimes. DNA of incarcerated people has already been collected in a genetic profile bank. However, the federal government has increased investment in the project so that more states can collect genetic material. The Integrated Network of Genetic Profile Banks is meant to ‘maintain, share, and compare genetic profiles to help in criminal investigation (Pedro Vilela September 19, 2019, Agencia Brasil).’ Our concern is that police officers can request the DNA collection of anyone accused of a crime even when they are innocent. 

Our third concern is the threat of quilombo families from their land in the state of Maranhão. The Alcântara agreement or the “Acordo de Salvaguardas Tecnológicas” Safeguard Technologies/ Technologies Safeguard Agreement –permits the United States to utilize the Center of Satellite Launch of Alcântara, Maranhão. On August 20, 2019 the Commission of Exterior Relations and 

Defense of Council approved the agreement for ratification in the Brazilian Congress. There was no discussion with community members. Our concern is that an expansion of the satellite program will lead to the expulsion of over 800 quilombo (descendants of runaway/fugitive enslaved people) families. This is one of many examples of the violent displacement of quilombo communities in Brazil. 

This statement is written in the decades-long tradition of Black solidarity that spans national borders. This is not the first case of Black transnational solidarity. Blacks across continents have expressed solidarity with each other for many decades. The anti-apartheid campaign in the United States was an example of Black Americans showing solidarity with Black South Africans. The Brazilian anti-police brutality group Reaja ou Será Morto expresses solidarity with all those of African-descent who have been killed by police internationally. In this way, we locate ourselves in a historical milieu where Blacks have expressed solidarity across continents. We want it to be explicitly known that we are paying attention to and condemning the deterioration of democracy and human rights in Brazil, especially as they concern Black lives and Black rights. 

We seek the restoration of human rights in Brazil and for low-income, Black communities to be treated with respect and dignity. Black Brazilian communities should not be over-policed and subjected to militarized zones. 

Special thanks to Glady Mitchell-Walthour and the following signatories for coordinating this statement: Sharelle Barber, USNDB; Kia Caldwell, USNDB; Juliana Goés, independent researcher; Nia Hampton, USNDB; Michael Hanchard, USNDB; Zakiya Carr Johnson, USNDB; Hannah Moore, USNDB; Dalila Negreiros, USNDB; James Steele, USNDB; Erica Williams, USBDB; Eliseo Jacob, USNDB; Deputado Fábio Felix (PSOL)-President of the Defense of Human Rights, Citizenship, Ethics and Parlamentary Decorum Commission of the Legislative Council of the Federal District; Senator Paulo Paim, President of the Commission of Human Rights of the Federal Senate; Arthur Antonio Santos Araujo- Our Black Collective (Nosso Coletivo Negro); EDUCAFRO; The United Black Movement (Movimento Negro Unificado); and Elisa Larkin Nascimento, Scholar and Activist. 

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Dr. Hoyt Alexander King, 1944-2019 https://www.ncobps.org/dr-hoyt-alexander-king-1944-2019 Sun, 15 Dec 2019 19:56:00 +0000 https://www.ncobps.org/?p=3450 The National Conference of Black Political Scientists (NCOBPS) expresses our condolences to the family of Dr. Hoyt King, a retired political science professor at Tennessee State University (TSU).  He passed away on December 15, 2019.   Originally from East Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Dr. King earned his undergraduate degree from Southern University.  He received graduate degrees in political science from Clark Atlanta University and West Virginia University.  He also served as President at the Historically Black College and Universities of West Virginia State University-Institute.

Dr. King taught political science for three decades in TSU’s Department of History, Political Science, and Geography and served as President of TSU’s Federal Credit Union.  He spent considerable time building international programs in South America, Cameroon, South Africa, and Central Europe.  In lieu of flowers, his family is requesting that donations be made in his name to Doctors Without Borders, https://donate.doctorswithoutborders.org/onetime.cfm.

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Dr. Cobie Archer Harris (Kwasi) https://www.ncobps.org/cobi-kwasi-harris Tue, 01 Oct 2019 16:22:21 +0000 https://www.ncobps.org/?p=2743 Dr. Cobie Archer Harris (Kwasi)

August 2, 1953-September 27, 2019

NCOBPS mourns the loss of Dr. Cobie Archer Harris (also known as “Kwasi”).  Dr. Harris was a Professor Emeritus of African American Studies and Political Science at San Jose State University. 

Dr. Harris was active with NCOBPS in the 1990s.  His research focused on the black political economy, as well as African and Mediterranean politics.  He was a critical voice of Black Politics in the San Francisco Bay Area. In the mid-2000s, he mobilized SJSU students to push for a statue commemorating Olympians John Carlos and Tommie Smith.  The track stars led protests at the 1968 Olympics and were SJSU alumni.   

NCOBPS sends our condolences to his family and friends.  He is survived by his wife, three children, and grandson. 

 

 

 

Dr. Cobie Archer Harris (“Kwasi”)

August 2, 1953 – Sept 27, 2019

NCOBPS mourns the loss of Dr. Cobie Archer Harris (also known as “Kwasi”).  Dr. Harris was a Professor Emeritus of African American Studies and Political Science at San Jose State University. 

Dr. Harris was active with NCOBPS in the 1990s.  His research focused on the black political economy, as well as African and Mediterranean politics.  He was a critical voice of Black Politics in the San Francisco Bay Area. In the mid-2000s, he mobilized SJSU students to push for a statue commemorating Olympians John Carlos and Tommie Smith.  The track stars led protests at the 1968 Olympics and were SJSU alumni.   

NCOBPS sends our condolences to his family and friends.  He is survived by his wife, three children, and grandson. 

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Dr. Michael Combs, 1950-2019 https://www.ncobps.org/dr-michael-combs-1950-2019 Fri, 06 Sep 2019 18:51:58 +0000 https://www.ncobps.org/?p=3446

It is with deep sadness to announce the passing of Dr. Michael Combs, a Full Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Nebraska. Dr. Combs died on August 29. He was 69-years old.

Dr. Combs served as President of the National Conference of Black Political Scientists (NCOBPS) from 1987-1988. As a trusted colleague, mentor and accomplished scholar, his work on urban politics was the gold standard in political science. He did cutting-edge research on urban politics, exploring race at the intersection of residential mobility, education, and police brutality. His book “Race and Place: Race Relations in an American City” (co-authored with Susan Welch, Lee Sigleman, and Timothy Bledsoe) received the Urban Politics Book of the Year Award from the American Political Science Association in 2001. He also researched judicial politics and authored “Civil Liberties and the Constitution: Cases and Commentaries” (co-authored with Lucius Barker, Twiley Barker, Jr., Kevin Lyles, and H.W. Perry Jr.).

Faith and service are central to the Combs family. Born and raised in Louisiana, Dr. Combs was the great-grandson, grandson, and son of Baptist ministers. For 30 years, he served as Pastor of Mount Zion Baptist Church, Nebraska’s oldest black Baptist church. He previously served as Associate Pastor of Star of Bethlehem Baptist Church in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Addressing racial inequities was at the forefront of Dr. Combs’ life work. Several years ago, he organized a university-wide discussion on blacks and police killings after protests erupted in Ferguson, Missouri in response to the killing of Michael Brown. In 2018, through his dual roles as a pastor and professor in Lincoln, Nebraska, he backed the efforts of the NAACP and American Civil Liberties Union to challenge a “school-to-prison” pipeline policy that would have harmed children of color. His church operated as a Beloved Community for the least of these and home-sick students in need of support, love, and tutoring.

Dr. D’Andra Orey worked with Dr. Combs at Nebraska in the early-mid 2000s before leaving for Jackson State University. After hearing about his death Orey stated, “Dr. Combs was an advocate for marginalized groups. As a Baptist preacher and judicial scholar, he was a voice of reason. He was a professional mentor and a spiritual counselor.” Dr. Combs was part of the generation of black scholars that bridged the divide between the campus and community and revolutionized the political science discipline.

NCOBPS sends our condolences to the family and friends of Dr. Combs, especially his wife Dr. Gwendolyn Marizett Combs, Associate Professor of Management and Coordinator in the Office of the Vice Chancellor at the University of Nebraska. Memorials to the family and flowers may be sent to Metcalf Funeral and Memorial Services, 245 N. 27th Street, Lincoln, NE 68503.

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NCOBPS’ Statement on Racism and Nativism https://www.ncobps.org/ncobps-statement-on-racism-and-nativism Thu, 25 Jul 2019 04:16:30 +0000 https://www.ncobps.org/?p=2553 National Conference of Black Political Scientists Condemns the Wave of Racism and Nativism

Contacts:
Sekou Franklin, President
Tiffany Willoughby-Herard, President-Elect
Kathie Stromile Golden, Executive Director

July 24, 2019—As an organization dedicated to racial justice, dignity, and liberation, the National Conference of Black Political Scientists (NCOBPS) condemns the wave of racism, bigotry, and nativism of the past few months as evidenced by:

  • The burning of a building at the Highlander Research and Education Center in New Market, Tennessee, a movement center for civil rights, labor and social justice activists since the 1930s. After the fire, investigators found a “white power” symbol painted on the site of the training center.
  • The burning of three black churches in Louisiana in March, which are being investigated as hate crimes.
  • Toxic statements by President Donald Trump and his supporters against Congresswomen Ayanna Pressley, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ilhan Omar, and Rashida Tlaib, telling them to go back to the “broken and crime infested places from which they came” and to “send them back.” These attacks are eerily similar to those made by racial segregationists against civil rights activists.
  • Trump’s child detention policy that imprisons children and their parents in inhumane conditions.
  • A policy proposal by the Trump administration to restrict legal entry and requests for asylum of people who presumably will overstay their visas. If implemented, the policy would adversely impact people from African and Caribbean countries.
  • Racist, sexist, and homophobic social media posts by law enforcement officials and border patrol agents that were revealed in investigative reports by ProPublica and the Plain View Project.
  • A state proclamation signed by Tennessee’s Governor, Bill Lee, declaring July 13th Nathan Bedford Forrest Day. Forrest, a confederate general who massacred hundreds of surrendering black soldiers at Fort Pillow in 1864, became the Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan after the Civil War.
  • The Department of Justice’s refusal to prosecute the NYPD officer who killed Eric Garner, an unarmed black man, in 2014.
  • Inaction by Majority Leader, Mitch McConnell, on voting rights protections and attacks on voting rights by state lawmakers in Florida, Tennessee, and Mississippi, which have sparked lawsuits by civil rights organizations. In the context of an ambiguous decision by the Supreme Court on redistricting in Summer 2019, equal access to the ballot is left to the bad faith of local and state partisan officials.
  • The Trump administration’s attempt to change the U.S. Census procedure to diminish the count of racial and non-English speaking minorities.

These are not isolated incidences or anomalies. They are fueled by white racial resentment and embedded in United States institutions, society, and culture. The Trump presidency is also foregrounding racial resentment and leveraging political institutions to achieve his objective, perhaps, to polarize the electorate in the lead up to the 2020 presidential election.

NCOBPS stands against racism, nativism, and bigotry. We are committed to championing racial justice and equity-based agendas in our academic institutions and intellectual circles. We also call upon colleges and universities to create safe spaces for students, faculty, and administrators to address the trauma caused by these and other racists actions and behaviors, as well as the institutionalized practices of ongoing systemic racism.

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Dr. Byrdie Larkin https://www.ncobps.org/dr-byrdie-larkin Tue, 02 Jul 2019 04:14:09 +0000 https://www.ncobps.org/?p=2551 In Memoriam
Dr. Byrdie Larkin, 1952-2019

It is with deep sadness that we report the passing of Dr. Byrdie Larkin, a long-time member of the National Conference of Black Political Scientists. Dr. Larkin died unexpectedly in her home on June 2. She previously served on NCOBPS’s Executive Council and W.E.B. DuBois Book Award Committee, as well as the Executive Board of the Alabama Political Science Association.

Dr. Larkin was a proud graduate of Clark Atlanta University’s doctoral program in political science. She retired in 2016 after a four-decade career at Alabama State University. She was the former chair of ASU’s Department of History and Political Science. An advocate for gender equity in higher education, she was the only tenured woman in her department.

For many journalists in Alabama, Dr. Larkin was the principal expert on racial policy and black politics in the state. Her insight on Alabama politics can be found in Time, Tuscaloosa News, Montgomery Advertiser, and Associated Press. She also served on the Advisory Board of Endarch: Journal of Political Research.

Although trained in political science, Dr. Larkin spent her retirement years working on creative writing projects. Her 2017 novel, Reservoir, reflected her abiding faith, love of HBCUs, and life-long ties to Alabama. Her previous book, That Our Faith May Be Tested, was a collection of spiritual testimonies about her childhood, family, and challenges as a young professor.

NCOBPS remembers Dr. Larkin for her brilliance, kind-heartedness, and down-home sensibilities. We will truly miss having Dr. Larkin and her sister at our annual meetings. We send condolences to the Larkin family, ASU, and her home church, Mt. Gillard Baptist Church in Montgomery. Sympathy cards and other correspondences can be sent to her sister, Lula Darnell Larkin, 118 Harold Street, Troy, Alabama 36081.

Sekou Franklin, President
NCOBPS INC

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